Emily Nixon Jewellery

Emily Nixon creates sculptural jewellery using the traditional lost-wax casting process. She lives and works in Cornwall and uses pebbles and seaweed, collected from the Penzance tide line, as her tools. Each piece organically twists and folds, capturing the raw texture of the ragged sea landscapes.

Emily Nixon Wrap Ring

€160.00
Silver
Size: One Size

Sterling silver with an organic texture inspired by the Cornish landscapes and tide lines. Sculptural in form. Created in Cornwall by Emily Nixon using the lost-wax casting process. The size of this ring can be gently adjusted.

Details

925 silver.
Made in the United Kingdom.
Band width 5.6mm. Crossover section 8.3mm. Size adjustable L-N.

Delivery & Returns

Reviews

Shapes of the Sea | Emily Nixon Jewellery

With the sun slowly rising behind St. Michael's Mount, Emily gathers her tools and materials that have been washed up on the tideline; ribbons of kelp, worn and weathered pieces of driftwood and twisted coils of seaweed with tactile edges. "The kelp ribbons can be over a metre long sometimes," Emily says, fixated over the frills and silkiness, "I have them everywhere, my car is full of them!"

With the sun slowly rising behind St. Michael's Mount, Emily gathers her tools and materials that have been washed up on the tideline; ribbons of kelp, worn and weathered pieces of driftwood and twisted coils of seaweed with tactile edges. "The kelp ribbons can be over a metre long sometimes," Emily says, fixated over the frills and silkiness, "I have them everywhere, my car is full of them!"

It is these natural knots, folds and dinks that form the starting point of Emily's jewellery. Torn ends of kelp and knobs of seaweed are transported by the bag-load to her loft studio in Hayle, where each piece is ordered and hung up above her old wooden desk to dry. "I love these dried-up, gnarly bits that appear on the beach after a storm," Emily describes, whilst observing a tangled, root-like growth. "Like this holdfast, for example. It is the bit of the seaweed that attaches and anchors itself to the rock. The roots are the most beautiful bit.

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